Learn To Loom Knit: Double Brim Beanie Tutorial

Hey friends! I’m so excited for today’s post, because today marks the start of the Learn To Loom Knit series! This mini knit-a-long is going to be so much fun. My love for fiber arts began with loom knitting, and I’m excited to dive back into this craft and make some beautiful loom knit goodies with you! If you haven’t joined the knit-a-long already, you’re missing out; sign up for the email list here and I’ll send you the super-simple supply list and the invite to our private facebook group!

Loom Knit Tutorial

This is the first post in the series, which means we’ll be learning the very basics of loom knitting, like how to cast on, making the twisted knit stitch, and the terminology you’ll want to know. For our first project, we’ll be making a chunky double brim beanie. Hats are some of the easiest and fastest projects to knit on the loom, and you’ll be addicted to making them!

Loom Knit Tutorial

This tutorial is for an adult size beanie. If you want a child size beanie, try using the second largest loom in your set. Or for a baby/toddler size beanie, try the second smallest loom.

Size

Finished project fits an average adult head (between 21″-23″).

Supplies

For this project, you’ll need:

Large round knitting loom (I use & recommend the largest size from this set)

Loom knitting hook (the set above comes with one, but I prefer this one)

1 skein of Lion Brand Wool-Ease Thick & Quick in Fisherman

Scissors

Tapestry needle

Terms

Anchor peg: The small peg extending from the side of your loom

First peg: The working peg to the right of the anchor peg

Last peg: The working peg to the left of your anchor peg

Loop: A loop made from wrapping your peg

Edge loop: A loop at the edge of your work made from casting on

Loom Knit Double Brim Beanie Tutorial

To start, make a slip knot around the small peg that sticks out from the side of your large round loom (this is the “anchor peg”). This just means the yarn will be secure while we cast on and knit the first few rows.

Loom Knit Tutorial

Cast-On

Take your working yarn and wrap it clockwise around the first peg, like so:

Loom Knit Tutorial

Loom Knit Tutorial

Loom Knit Tutorial

This kind of wrap creates and “e” shape around the peg, which is why it’s called an e-wrap. Here’s the backside for an extra visual:

Loom Knit Tutorial

Now wrap your next peg.

Loom Knit Tutorial

As you wrap your pegs, make sure you’re not wrapping it too tight. You want it to be pretty snug, but if you pull your loops too tight then it makes the next step very difficult.

Loom Knit Tutorial

Wrap to the last peg.

Loom Knit Tutorial

While holding on to your working yarn so your loops don’t unravel, use your free thumb to push all those loops down to the bottoms of the pegs.

Loom Knit Tutorial

Now we’re going to repeat the wrapping process. Wrap your yarn clockwise around the first peg, like so:

Loom Knit Tutorial

Loom Knit Tutorial

You’ll now have two loops on that peg. Wrap your next peg, and each peg around, until you reach the last peg and every peg has two loops on it.

Loom Knit Tutorial

Loom Knit Tutorial

While securing your working yarn (I like to loosely tie it around the anchor peg for this next step, but you might like to just hold it with your thumb), take your loom hook to the last peg you worked, and use the hook to lift the bottom loop up, going over the top loop, and slip it completely off the peg.

Loom Knit Tutorial

Loom Knit Tutorial

Loom Knit Tutorial

This loop might be a little tight, depending on how tightly you wrapped your loops, so if it’s too tight and you can’t lift it up and over then you may need to unravel and start over. Here’s what it should look like:

Loom Knit Tutorial

And a view from the back side:

Loom Knit Tutorial

Once the bottom loop is off the peg, move to the next peg to your right. (This should be the first peg; the peg you start each row with.) Repeat the last step; lift the bottom loop up over the top loop and off the peg.

Loom Knit Tutorial

Loom Knit Tutorial

Loom Knit Tutorial

Keep sliding each bottom loop off of their pegs.

Loom Knit Tutorial

And a view from the back side:

Loom Knit Tutorial

You may like to insert your hook from the top side of the bottom loop instead of from the bottom side.

Loom Knit Tutorial

Loom Knit Tutorial

It produces the same result, so just do what’s most comfortable for you! (I like to insert my hook from the top; I feel like it’s easier to get a rhythm that way.)

Loom Knit Tutorial

Keep going until you reach the last peg with a bottom loop. Slide that loop off the peg, and you’ve completed your e-wrap cast on!

Loom Knit Tutorial

Making The Twisted Knit Stitch

Now you’ll start knitting. Push the loops already on your pegs down to the bottom, then take your working yarn and wrap it clockwise around your first peg.

Loom Knit Tutorial

Continue wrapping each peg until you reach your last peg.

Loom Knit Tutorial

Use your hook to slip each bottom loop up and off each peg, just like you did before.

Loom Knit Tutorial

Loom Knit Tutorial

Continue around each peg until you reach the last peg.

Loom Knit Tutorial

Now you’ve completed your first row of stitches! The stitch we’re using is called the twisted knit stitch, due to the way the e-wrap loops give each stitch a slight ‘twisted’ look.

Brim

Continue knitting for 19 more rounds, so that you have 20 rows of stitches total. (At about your 5th or 6th row, you can remove the slip knot from your anchor peg and pull it loose, since if you leave it on too long it can pull your work and warp your stitches.)

Your work should look something like this:

Loom Knit Tutorial

And a view from the bottom side:

Loom Knit Tutorial

To create the brim of your hat you’ll want to find the loop at the bottom of your work that corresponds with the row that comes form working the first peg. Uncurl the bottom edge of your work, and locate the vertical line of stitches that leads up to the first peg (the peg directly to the right of your anchor peg). Here’s how I find mine:

Loom Knit Tutorial

The line of stitches to the left of my thumb, that has the working yarn coming out of it, is the row I’m looking for.

Loom Knit Tutorial

Now I’m going to move the working yarn out of the way so I can see the loop underneath it.

Loom Knit Tutorial

I’m going to pinch that loop, being careful not to pull it too loose, and slide it over the first peg (the peg directly to the right of my anchor peg).

Loom Knit Tutorial

Loom Knit Tutorial

This is the start of the brim! Once you have that first loop on the first peg, take the loop directly to the right of the loop you just pinched, and slide it over the next peg.

Loom Knit Tutorial

Continue like this around your loom, making sure that each loop at the edge of your work goes over its matching peg, so that you don’t have any gaps in the seam of your brim.

Loom Knit Tutorial

Once finished, your work should look something like this:

Loom Knit Tutorial

Now take your hook to the first peg, and slide the bottom loop up over the top loop, and off the peg.

Loom Knit Tutorial

Loom Knit Tutorial

Continue around your loom until you reach the last peg.

Loom Knit Tutorial

And now you have a brim!

Loom Knit Tutorial

Body

To knit the body of the hat, repeat the steps you learned to make the twisted knit stitch; e-wrap each peg, slide the bottom loops off the pegs using your hook, push your new loops down to the bottom of the pegs, and repeat. Knit 20 rounds for a fitted hat, or knit up to 25 rounds for a slouchier-fitting hat (though be warned, you may need an extra skein of yarn for that).

Loom Knit Tutorial

Bind-Off

For this part, you’ll need scissors and a tapestry needle.

Loom Knit Tutorial

Cut your working yarn from its skein, making sure it’s about 30″-35″ long, and thread your needle.

Loom Knit Tutorial

Slide your needle up under the right side of the loop on the first peg.

Loom Knit Tutorial

Thread the working yarn all the way through the loop, like so:

Loom Knit Tutorial

Repeat this step for each peg until you’ve threaded your working yarn through each loop.

Loom Knit Tutorial

Now take your hook, and gently remove the loop from the first peg.

Loom Knit Tutorial

Loom Knit Tutorial

Repeat this step for each peg around, until your hat is completely detached from the loom.

Loom Knit Tutorial

Loom Knit Tutorial

Pull your working yarn tight, closing up the top of your hat.

Loom Knit Tutorial

Making sure your needle is threaded, sew the closure tighter by criss-crossing the thread a few times through the closure.

Loom Knit Tutorial

If you’re not adding a pom pom, trim the remaining yarn tail.

Loom Knit Tutorial

If you’re adding a pom pom to your hat, don’t trim the remaining yarn yet! Take your needle and use it to sew the loose yarn in the brim of your hat, the yarn tail that came from your slip knot at the very beginning of your project, into the stitches so that it’s secure.

Loom Knit Tutorial

Loom Knit Tutorial

If you’re skipping the pom pom: you’re all done!

Loom Knit Tutorial

The pom-pom tutorial is coming next week or so- keep your eye out for that! Until then, you can use this tutorial to make your pom. I’ve referenced it many times and it’s a great resource!

If you have any questions about this tutorial, leave a comment below or send me an email! You can also join our Loom Knit-A-Long if you haven’t already by signing up here! You’ll get access to our private Facebook group, as well as each project pattern and tutorial sent to you in print-friendly PDF form. That’s right- free PDF loom knitting patterns and their matching tutorials sent straight to your inbox!

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Free Loom Knitting Tutorial For Beginners

Free Loom Knitting Tutorial For Beginners

Double Brim Beanie - Free Loom Knitting Tutorial

 

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More projects from Em’s Fiber Arts you might like:

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